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Boycott Gallery Rental ‘Exhibition’ at Evergold

To Whom It May Concern (again):

The unfortunate reality is that both SFAI and Tuấn Mami squandered an opportunity to really present a perspective beyond SFAI’s current trend of teaching courses structured in the Western tradition.

Due to the tight timeframe of NG-220A, the best way to proceed would have been to have the class re-perform performance-based works from SEA artists. In this way, students could truly come to know – or, at the very least, be presented with the opportunity to learn – what it is to create and do performance art within the strictures of SEA.

Instead, students have not thought or cared to know anything beyond their immediate personal concerns or interests as translated through their idea of what performance entails. An even larger travesty is the sheer inability to grasp the context of the public sphere and its shifting landscapes and emanations. For example, here are the titles for the Evergold gallery rental exhibition as proposed and generated by the class:

• Transient
TRANSient VISITOR(S)
• TRANS space

These titles were proposed for a show happening in the Tenderloin in the City of San Francisco. A city known for its GLBTQ history and highly visible homeless population. The last title, TRANS space, was proposed by the course’s adjunct. To say the very least, these titles speak to the inordinate entitlement and carelessness of a class of people concerned with no one and nothing beyond themselves. To say more, it is reflective of the cultural insensitivity and willful ignorance percolating through all spheres of American contemporary society.

Quite simply, this course has been permitted to run in an insatiably irresponsible fashion. And I am not of a mind to condone such behavior or actions because a syllabus ‘instructs’ me to do so.



Sincerely,

Brenna Nolan

3 July 2013

http://performanceinthepublicsphere.blogspot.com/2013/07/boycott-gallery-rental-exhibition.html

Posted on Wednesday, July 3rd 2013

futurejournalismproject:

The Guantánamo Memoirs of Mohamedou Ould Slahi
Via Slate:

Mohamedou Ould Slahi began to tell his story in 2005. Over the course of several months, the Guantánamo prisoner handwrote his memoir, recounting what he calls his “endless world tour” of detention and interrogation. He wrote in English, a language he mastered in prison. His handwriting is relaxed but neat, his narrative, even riddled with redactions, vivid and captivating. In telling his story he tried, as he wrote, “to be as fair as possible to the U.S. government, to my brothers, and to myself.” He finished his 466-page draft in early 2006. For the next six years, the U.S. government held the manuscript as a classified secret.
When his pro bono attorneys were allowed to hand me a disk labeled “Unclassified Version” last year, Slahi had been a Guantánamo detainee for more than a decade. I sat down to start reading his manuscript nearly 10 years to the day from the book’s opening scene:
“[Redacted] July 2002, 22:00. The American team takes over. The music was off. The conversations of the guards faded away. The truck emptied.”
We’re in the middle of the action. Slahi’s life in captivity had begun eight months earlier, on Nov. 20, 2001, when Slahi, then 30, was summoned by Mauritanian police for questioning. He had just returned home from work; he was in the shower when police arrived. He dressed, grabbed his car keys—he went voluntarily, driving himself to the police station—and told his mother not to worry, he would be home soon.

Overview: How the United States kept him silent for 12 years.
Part 01: Endless Interrogations.
Part 02: Disappeared.
Part 03: Family.
Timeline of Slahi’s detention.
Image: Handwritten page from Mohamedou Ould Slahi’s memoir (PDF), via Slate.

futurejournalismproject:

The Guantánamo Memoirs of Mohamedou Ould Slahi

Via Slate:

Mohamedou Ould Slahi began to tell his story in 2005. Over the course of several months, the Guantánamo prisoner handwrote his memoir, recounting what he calls his “endless world tour” of detention and interrogation. He wrote in English, a language he mastered in prison. His handwriting is relaxed but neat, his narrative, even riddled with redactions, vivid and captivating. In telling his story he tried, as he wrote, “to be as fair as possible to the U.S. government, to my brothers, and to myself.” He finished his 466-page draft in early 2006. For the next six years, the U.S. government held the manuscript as a classified secret.

When his pro bono attorneys were allowed to hand me a disk labeled “Unclassified Version” last year, Slahi had been a Guantánamo detainee for more than a decade. I sat down to start reading his manuscript nearly 10 years to the day from the book’s opening scene:

“[Redacted] July 2002, 22:00. The American team takes over. The music was off. The conversations of the guards faded away. The truck emptied.”

We’re in the middle of the action. Slahi’s life in captivity had begun eight months earlier, on Nov. 20, 2001, when Slahi, then 30, was summoned by Mauritanian police for questioning. He had just returned home from work; he was in the shower when police arrived. He dressed, grabbed his car keys—he went voluntarily, driving himself to the police station—and told his mother not to worry, he would be home soon.

Overview: How the United States kept him silent for 12 years.

Part 01: Endless Interrogations.

Part 02: Disappeared.

Part 03: Family.

Timeline of Slahi’s detention.

Image: Handwritten page from Mohamedou Ould Slahi’s memoir (PDF), via Slate.

Posted on Tuesday, April 30th 2013

Reblogged from The FJP

… we have to keep on pushing people who are in a position to turn to painters, sculptors and craftsmen, This is a kind of a poverty situation where the richest country in the world spiritually and culturally is so poor, when you consider the tremendous building program, the billions of dollars that are used today in reconstruction of our cities, But I’m critical of some of the architecture, I think it’s rather anti-human, clinical, It’s done by an engineer rather than by an architect. I think it’s done with very little regard for the people who function in it. They are afraid of the artist. They don’t know how to use artists. I would love to see a kind of rebirth of the thing we had in the l930s where art was brought to the people in all the forms.

Oral history interview with Anton Refregier, 1964 Nov. 5, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Posted on Sunday, September 30th 2012